• McGinness Re-elect Skull and Bones billboard front view
    Ryan McGinness, "Re-elect Skull & Bones," 2015 (click arrows for more images)
    On main billboard June-August 2015
  • Ryan McGinness, Re-elect Skull & Bones billboard side view
    McGinness on main billboard with I-70 traffic in background (click arrows for more images)
  • McGinness Satellite Web
     Ryan McGinness, "Re-elect Skull & Bones," 2015 (click arrows for more images)
    On satellite billboard September-November 2015 
  • McGinness Scholars
    Missouri Military Academy billboard narrative behind McGinness's "Re-Elect Skull & Bones" (click arrows for more images)
  • McGinness Athletes
    Missouri Military Academy billboard narrative (click arrows for more images)
  • McGinness Leaders
    Missouri Military Academy billboard narrative (click arrows for more images)
  • McGinness Character
    Missouri Military Academy billboard narrative (click arrows for more images)
  • McGinness MMA
    Missouri Military Academy billboard, last in six-ad series interrupted by "Re-elect Skull & Bones" in its satellite location
    (click arrows for more images)

In our current system, does it make a difference which party we vote for? The I-70 Sign Show marks the start of the presidential campaign with new work by Ryan McGinness that poses this question. The central icon traditionally connotes tombstones, poison, and pirates. Here, it also recalls the famous Yale secret society whose former members include past and current U.S. politicians and presidents, White House advisors, and influential corporate titans—Republicans and Democrats alike. “Re-elect Skull & Bones” both urges rebellion and doubts our ability to rebel, critiquing our democracy as one commandeered by an undefeatable band of power elites. No matter whom we elect, do we always get Skull & Bones?
On the main billboard (July–August 2015), the political message of McGinness's piece was more general. In its second location (September–October 2015), near the town of Jonesburg, the Skull & Bones reference to male privilege and achievement rooted in education became more pointed, because of its position in the middle of a sequence of ads for the Missouri Military Academy, promoting SCHOLARS, ATHLETES, LEADERS, and YOUNG MEN OF GOOD CHARACTER.
Ryan McGinness is an American artist, living and working in New York City. He grew up in the surf and skate culture of Virginia Beach, Virginia, and studied at Carnegie Mellon University as an Andrew Carnegie Scholar. Known for his extensive vocabulary of original graphic drawings that use the visual language of public signage, corporate logos, and contemporary symbology, McGinness is credited with elevating the status of the icon to fine art through his paintings, sculptures, installations, and books. Concerned with the perceived value of forms, he assumes the power of this visual language in order to share personal expressions. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Cincinnati Art Museum, MUSAC in Léon, Spain, and the Taguchi Art Collection, in Tokyo.
http://www.ryanmcginness.com/
Copyright © 2015 — I-70 Sign Show
All artist images, copyright © the respective artists

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